Sometime in the last couple of years, I ordered a new coffee press and mug from Stanley off of Amazon. Full disclosure here, I’ve never used any Stanley products before, but I needed a new travel coffee mug. A quick search brought me to the Stanley Classic One Hand 20oz Vacuum Mug.

I also enjoy pressed style coffee, so I wanted something other than a glass French press to add to my adventure gear. I initially included a glass French press in my adventure box but thought better of it. Cleaning up broken glass after bumping down the trails at the end of the day didn’t seem like any fun. Stanley released a slew of camping related items, and their Mountain Vacuum Coffee System covers me in terms of having a press.

The Coffee Mug

I’ll start with this. Never have I had a coffee mug that has kept my coffee hot (I mean hot, not lukewarm) throughout the entire day. I’ve tried other sealed mugs where the temperature of the beverage changes throughout the day. And while your hot beverage of choice might be warm-ish by the end of the day in other mugs, the Stanley Vacuum mug won’t let you down.

Stanley states that the mug will keep hot beverages hot for 9 hours, cold beverages cold for 8 hours, and iced beverages iced for 35 hours. I haven’t tried cold or iced beverages yet, but I can attest to the 9 hours for hot drinks. I would even go so far as to say that I’ve had beverages stay hot longer than the 9 hours.

The tall and slender design of this mug allows you to quickly wrap your hand around the mug for a secure hold. I purchased the 20 oz mug, which is the larger of three options, so it’s slightly more awkward to hold than the smaller sizes. The 16 oz or even the 12 oz options might be better for full hand engagement or if you have smaller hands.

This is a spill-proof mug, and that is partly due to the top automatically resealing. To drink from this mug, you have to depress and hold the button on the head. It does not lock open and closed. Most of my past coffee mugs either had this option or a lid to flip open. I prefer the locking top so getting used to pressing the button each time was a bit of a hassle, but it did prevent accidental spillage. In the end, I would highly recommend this coffee mug to anyone.

The Press and Thermos

Keeping a glass French press in your camp kit might not be a good idea. While mine hasn’t broken yet, I can see it getting smashed in the future. As I enjoy pressed coffee over traditionally made coffee, I decided to get a more camp friendly option. The Stanley Mountain Vacuum Coffee System fits the bill, with one caveat. It’s big. I decided to go with the larger 1.1-quart size as opposed to the 17 oz size. With the larger sized system, it does not fit snuggly in my adventure box like my current French press does. The Mountain Vacuum Coffee System comes with six pieces: two cups that screw together, a storage top to hold grinds, the thermos, a pot, and press screen for the pot. They all fit together nicely for storage when you’re not making coffee.

Stanley coffee press apart.

Stanley coffee press apart.

The process of making coffee with this system isn’t hard. If you’ve made coffee in a French press before you should know how to do this, heat water, add coffee, and let steep for 5-10 minutes. The nice thing about this system is the thermos top allows for coffee grinds to be stored inside it. The top holds just less than a measuring cups worth of grinds. If you’re just getting out overnight, you can load up the top and not have to carry more than what you need.

I used my stove at home to heat the water in the pot. After about 10 minutes the water was not quite boiling and was ready for the grinds. I poured in half a tops worth of grinds, stirred them up (pack something to stir with), and let the coffee sit for 10 minutes. Once the steeping has completed, you drop the press basket into the pot and carefully press down the grinds.

The one thing to be careful with is how much water to add to the pot. During my initial test, I filled the pot above where the handle resides. Once I added in my coffee and pressed it down, I ended up with a nice coffee pool on my counter. I would recommend not having water above where the handle attaches to the pot.

Pouring the coffee out into a mug was pretty easy, but I do wish the press basket locked into place. I understand it won’t work with the grinds in the bottom, but I was concerned it was going to fall out while pouring. If you’ve got a full pot of water, you should get about 6 cups of coffee out of it using the included mugs. The thermos holds an entire pot of coffee with some possibly left over depending how much water you’ve added (again, I don’t recommend filling past the grab handle).

I poured the contents of my recently made coffee into the thermos and left it on my kitchen counter for about 4 hours. This was an unusually warm day so the air conditioning was running and it was cold in my kitchen. I checked the coffee temperature every hour or so and never experienced a change in temperature. Much like the coffee mug, the thermos will keep hot drinks hot for 24 hours, cold drinks cold for 20 hours, and iced drinks iced for 100 hours. This is an absurd amount of time, but it’s good to know you could have a hot or cold beverage ready to go at the end of a long run of trails.

Conclusions and Field Test

I got the chance to test it out “in the field” several times over a few weekends using my camp stove. I haven’t tried it out on my backpacking stove yet, but I don’t imagine I’ll ever carry it in that sort of setup. As I mentioned, it unpacks and packs up quickly enough, and the stainless steel and plastic cleans up nicely when I’m done with it. The water pot didn’t take long at all to get the water to just below boiling. I didn’t notice the handle getting excessively hot either as I did with my stove test. I used a full cap full of a Tim Horton’s roast and let it steep for about 10 minutes. The screw together integrated mugs came in handy while sitting around the morning fire.

Overall I am very impressed with this system and would recommend it to anyone who wants a French press system in their camping gear. It’s easy to use, packs up nicely, and makes a good cup of coffee. The only downside is it’s not small or light, something I can get over. If you’re a coffee drinker and you keep an adventure box in your car ready to go, you may have to rethink your storage solution, but overall this is a great product.

Mug Purchase Links: Stanley Website | Amazon

Press Purchase LInks: Stanley Website | Amazon

Follow Stanley: Website | Facebook | Instagram | Twitter | YouTube

Did we miss something? Want to read more about a specific topic? Interested in writing for us? Email us at [email protected]

Find us on YouTube, PinterestInstagramTwitter, and Facebook.

Written by

Nick is a lifelong Michigan resident, born and raised. He grew up in Bay City and transplanted to the metro Detroit area after college for work. Seeking more woods and outdoors time, he resolved to get out more. In a spark of creativity, he co-founded Michigan Overland with the intent to travel to parts unknown both within Michigan and abroad.

Latest comments
  • My favorite & goto coffee mug! Wasn’t even aware of their press system. As I much as like using a press at home, that could come in handy to save me munching on cowboy coffee when I’m wandering.

    • Love the mug, well worth the money. The coffee press is great to, although it’s difficult to picture when we would be carrying a thermos full of coffee. Maybe we’ll figure out a different use for it. Beer maybe?

      • Oops, must’ve missed the reply notification, bit late… but yeah that’s a good idea! A metal container with a good seal like that is way more likely to survive banging around in back on trail runs versus a growler / crowler 🍻

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.