M416 Overland Trailer Build – Part 6

There comes a time in every man’s life, when he does something so stupid, he can’t help but laugh. This is not one of those times. This time, I cried. While out on the boat with family, I jumped into the lake¬†with my phone in my pocket. My phone decided to swim to the bottom in 20′ deep water. So needless to say, I lose every picture of my build along with with a TON of other pictures and $2000 in cryptocurrency. Live and learn, I guess. Luckily, I had posted some on Facebook, so I was able to get enough to at least finish this series!

Anyways, back to the article!

So my tubing bender from Rogue Fab arrived. It took me a couple of days to put it together; then I started in on bending some of the tubing for my fenders. It took me a few (read: like 20) tries to get the right bends, but it was easy from there on out.

 

 

After getting the bends the way I wanted, I made a template for a mounting plate, converted it to CADD and had the backing plates laser cut. I then tack welded everything together and was able to test fit the fenders. I will be adding steps to them at a later date!

I took a break from the fenders and started fabbing up the racks for the top of the trailer. I made one larger one to hold the rooftop tent, and a smaller one to hold my axe and shovel. Originally  I had planned to make plates and bolt the rack to the top, but I opted for welding the rack on, mostly just because it was easier and it allowed me to have a little wider footprint.

After the rack was done, I test fit my RoadShower 4s to make sure it would fit, and it fit near perfectly!

Next, with the help of my wife and mother-in-law, I fabbed a small awning for over top of the cooking area. It was pretty simple to make from some conduit, and in the end, my cost was about $50 for materials. I made it so the whole thing could roll up and store inside the trailer. It is a really simple design, and hopefully, I can draw up some plans for others to make it in the future.

I did a TON of grinding, welding, grinding, smoothing, seam sealing that I didn’t get pictures of. When I felt it was ready, I primed all the bare metal, any spots that I had ground down, and prepped the trail for Bedliner. I wore a full Tyvek suit, mask, gloves, etc. while I was sanding the trailer down. Guess the paint from the ’60s isn’t quite as healthy as the paint used today. After a few hours of mess, it was ready to be bedlined.

I bedlined the tongue box and fenders separate so I could make sure to get good coverage under and behind them. And technically the fenders weren’t done yet. In the next part of the series, I will begin the final assembly!

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