Places to Go: Drummond Island

In keeping with the island theme, we started with Beaver Island, this quarter we’re going to shed some light on Drummond Island. Drummond is pretty well known to the off-road and overland community here in Michigan. It offers a good variety of trails that range from easy to challenging.

The Places to Go series explores adventure related points of interest in the state of Michigan. Highlighting everything from the large to small, the known to the unknown. If it’s interesting we might cover it and you should visit it.

The History

Drummond Island is, interestingly enough, named after a Canadian military officer. Gordon Drummond commanded both the Canadian government and military during the 1800s. It was also the last British outpost during the war of 1812 on American soil. In 1828 the island officially became part of the United States and is the only island in the Manitoulin chain of islands to fall in U.S. territory.

The township of Drummond is part of Chippewa County, which encompasses the eastern arm of the Upper Peninsula. It has a total area of 249 square miles with most of that being split between actual land (128 square miles) and water (120 square miles). Most of the island is actually a state park and is home to a unique environment.

The island is home to a thing grassy plain on a limestone bed known as alvar. Often times flooded in the Spring and dry in the summer, these plains are home to plants and animals more often found in grasslands. The Great Lakes region is home to a good number of these alvar plains though.

What To Do

Drummond Island is accessed only via ferry from mainland Michigan in the Upper Peninsula. Once on the island, there are over 40 miles of closed loop trails available to get lost on.

Marble Head is one of the main attractions on the island. Marble Head finds itself in a unique position. It is the first spot to see the sunrise in the Upper Peninsula at its 100 feet elevation. It also offers a mix of driving and hiking in order to access the top.

The fossil ledges are another unique area to visit on Drummond Island. Made from the remains of a saltwater coral bed, the fossil ledges require a high clearance off-road vehicle to get to.

We’ve only listed two items here because Drummond Island is a place that needs to be seen rather than read about. If you’re planning an off-road, overlanding style trip in the future then consider making Drummond Island your preferred spot.